agoodcartoon:

The cartoonist correctly applies the definition of “affordability” to an innovative light bulb with dramatically lower energy consumption and longer life than incandescents, and to health care reform which is projected to see a net reduction in costs. A good cartoon.

A good cartoon is my new favorite Tumblr.

agoodcartoon:

The cartoonist correctly applies the definition of “affordability” to an innovative light bulb with dramatically lower energy consumption and longer life than incandescents, and to health care reform which is projected to see a net reduction in costs. A good cartoon.

A good cartoon is my new favorite Tumblr.

seanbonner:

Easily the best Occupy Wall Street video yet

inothernews:

“What if we attack the deficit by getting rid of the Bush tax cuts?  OH, LOOK AT THAT!”

— Jon Stewart, offering an alternative to Paul Ryan’s proposed slashing of, among other things, Medicare and Medicaid to rein in spending, on The Daily Show


By offering an alternative, Jon Stewart turns the production of news into a “socio-moral instrument involving social and political observation and sharp critical commentary [which shows that] the satirical journalist is often sensitive to the gap between what is and what might be” (Lockyer, 2006, p.)

"It is the discrepancy between the reality and the ideal world the journalist would like to see (a world that reflects his own values and ideals), between what is and what should be to rephrase Lockyer, that triggers the journalist’s motor, his/her savage indignation". (Me, in my master’s thesis ‘Carnivalization of news. A study on media and satire in Europe’)

inothernews:

“What if we attack the deficit by getting rid of the Bush tax cuts?  OH, LOOK AT THAT!”

Jon Stewart, offering an alternative to Paul Ryan’s proposed slashing of, among other things, Medicare and Medicaid to rein in spending, on The Daily Show

By offering an alternative, Jon Stewart turns the production of news into a “socio-moral instrument involving social and political observation and sharp critical commentary [which shows that] the satirical journalist is often sensitive to the gap between what is and what might be” (Lockyer, 2006, p.)

"It is the discrepancy between the reality and the ideal world the journalist would like to see (a world that reflects his own values and ideals), between what is and what should be to rephrase Lockyer, that triggers the journalist’s motor, his/her savage indignation". (Me, in my master’s thesis ‘Carnivalization of news. A study on media and satire in Europe’)

Parody (the poster), exaggeration (the thorough list) and irony are here at work to defuse the polarized political messages and expose them as ridiculously extreme and extremely ridiculous.

Just as some people feel a sort of compulsion, when they see a picture hanging crooked, to walk up to it and straighten it, so the satirist feels driven to draw attention to any departure from what he believes to be the truth, or honesty, or justice. He wishes to restore balance, to correct the error; and often it must be admitted, to correct or punish the wrongdoer. (Sutherland, 1962)

Parody (the poster), exaggeration (the thorough list) and irony are here at work to defuse the polarized political messages and expose them as ridiculously extreme and extremely ridiculous.

Just as some people feel a sort of compulsion, when they see a picture hanging crooked, to walk up to it and straighten it, so the satirist feels driven to draw attention to any departure from what he believes to be the truth, or honesty, or justice. He wishes to restore balance, to correct the error; and often it must be admitted, to correct or punish the wrongdoer. (Sutherland, 1962)

(via harderbetterfastercolbert-deact)